RIP V/s OSPF | Differences between RIP and OSPF

OSPF was developed in the mid-1980s to overcome many of the deficiencies and scalability problems of RIP in large enterprise networks. In this tutorial, we will compare OSPF with RIP and discuss the main differences between them.

RIP

RIP is a classical routing protocol. It uses a simple metric to calculate the shortest path to every destination. It uses the number of routers as the metric. If more than one route to a destination is available, it selects the route having the lowest hop count. It has several limitations. For example, it does not support VLSM, authentication, and multicast routing updates. It is available in two variations: RIPv1 and RIPv2.

RIPv2 was developed to overcome the limitations of RIPv1. RIP2 addresses the issues of VLSM, authentication, and multicast routing updates. It was an improvement over RIPv1, but it still failed to address the limitations of hop count and slow convergence necessary for large networks.

OSPF

OSPF was developed to overcome the limitations of RIP. It uses a complex algorithm to select the fastest path to every destination. It supports VLSM, authentication, and multicast routing updates. Unlike RIP, it does not periodically broadcast the entire routing table.

It is available in three variations: OSPFv1, OSPFv2 and OSPFv3. OSPFv1 was the original variation. It was developed to support the networks of that time. OSPFv2 was developed as the replacement of the OSPFv1. OSPFv1 is no longer used. Since OSPFv1 is no longer used and OSPFv2 was developed as the replacement for OSPFv1, OSPFv2 is commonly called OSPF. The original implementation of OSPF does not support IPv6. Instead of adding support for IPv6 in OSPF, developers developed a separate variation known as OSPFv3 for IPv6.

Differences between RIP and OSPF

The following table compares RIP with OSPF and lists their differences.

RIP stands for Routing Information Protocol.OSPF stands for Open Shortest Path First.
RIP uses the Bellman-Ford algorithm.OSPF uses the Dijkstra algorithm.
RIP uses the hop counts as the metric. It has a limit of 15 hops. If your network has more than 15 hops, you cannot use RIP.OSPF has no limitation on the hop count. You can use it on a network of any size.
RIP does not support VLSM (Variable Length Subnet Masks).OSPF supports VLSM (Variable Length Subnet Masks).
RIP periodically broadcasts the complete routing table. It consumes a large amount of bandwidth.OSPF broadcasts the entire routing table only when it starts. If a change in the routing table occurs, it broadcasts only the change.
RIP is a Distance Vector protocol. It uses the distance (hops count) to determine the transmission path.OSPF is a link-state protocol. It uses a complex algorithm to determine the transmission path.
It is only suitable for small networks.It is suitable for all-size networks.
AD (Administrative Distance) value of RIP is 120. AD (Administrative Distance) value of OSPF is 110.
It uses a simple algorithm to calculate the best and shortest path for every destination. Since it uses a simple algorithm, it consumes less RAM and CPU than OSPF. It uses a simple algorithm to calculate the best and shortest path for every destination. Since it uses a complex algorithm, it consumes more RAM and CPU than RIP.
Since it broadcasts the entire routing table, it consumes more bandwidth than OSPF. Since it broadcasts only the updates, it consumes less bandwidth than RIP.
It uses a single multicast address 224.0.0.9. It uses two multicast addresses 224.0.0.5 and 224.0.0.6.

rip vs ospf

Differences between RIPv1, RIPv2, and OSPFv2

The following table compares RIPv1, RIPv2, and OSPFv2 based on various features and lists their differences.

Feature OSPFv2 RIPv1 RIPv2
Protocol type Link state Distance vector Distance vector
Algorithm Dijkstra Bellman ford Bellman ford
Metric Bandwidth Hops Hops
Hop count limit None 15 15
VLSM support Yes No Yes
Classless support Yes No Yes
Non-contiguous network support Yes No Yes
Auto-summarization No Yes Yes
Manual summarization Yes No Yes
Route propagation Multicast Broadcast Broadcast
Convergence Fast Slow Slow
Use authentication Yes No Yes
Update On event periodic periodic
Supported network type All types Flat only Flat only

ComputerNetworkingNotes CCNA Study Guide RIP V/s OSPF | Differences between RIP and OSPF